🖐 Friday Five (Next level Zoom skills, Modal alternatives, Email leaks, and more)

Hi Friends!

This is the very first edition of Friday Five, a weekly email with our top 5 finds to help you level up as a designer. Here's what we want to share with you this week.

Psst — Reply to this email and let us know what you think about Friday Five. This is a WIP and we'd love your feedback to make it even better. We read and respond to every reply :)


1) Get really, really good at presenting your designs on Zoom

Put this guide in the "forever changed my feeling about Zoom meetings" category. If you've ever struggled to present your designs on Zoom, or want to level up your design presenting skills on Zoom, this guide is for you. It covers literally everything. Best zoom settings? Check. Best Zoom features you don't know about? Check. Tips on what to do and not to do during presentations. Check. It's 30,000 words with lots of great resources and videos to help you make the most of the guide. 


2) We use way too many damn Modals

Not all modals are created equally. While there are genuine, good uses for them, many modals are invasive, confusing, and poorly accessible. This website shows you different design patterns to use instead of modals, plus gives you great tips on how to do modals right if you need to use one. Looking at you B2B SaaS designers.


3) What leaked technology emails can teach you about product strategy

We've been enjoying this Twitter account of leaked emails from tech companies. It's an interesting window into how great product builders think about strategy, design, and markets. For starters, we liked this email Mark Zuckerburg sent to his team on speed and strategy in 2008 and Mark Zuckerberg and CFO David Ebersman debate acquisition strategy in 2012. 


4) Reality has a surprising amount of detail

Reality has a surprising amount of detail. The idea comes from this outstanding essay, and it applies directly to designing products. People overestimate what they know and underestimate the complexity of the world. Think about the last feature you designed. All the little steps and details that went into each decision. The color choice, what words to use, how to access it, what it should do and what it should not do, is it free or paid, how users learn about it. Each new step comes with a new set of details, often not visible to you until you actually work the problem. If you're feeling stuck on a design, maybe this article will help you get unstuck and see the details you're missing. 


5) The Figma mock-up vs The actual website

Check out the full Twitter thread. The comments are gold like this one.


Have a great weekend!

Molly & Jake at UI Prep